OOSI Sculpture

Start

1981 / David E. Davis / Cleveland

Start2017a.jpg

Start seems to unfold through time and space over a well traveled walkway. On one side, a red base with a square cutout supports a 52" wide yellow strut that splits and twists overhead, meeting with a 26" silver beam with a semi circular cutout. Davis' clever use of color, composition, and size starts the viewers eye at the pop of red along the base. We are then lead up to the intersection of the two elements, where Davis expertly transitions from one section to the other by way of negative space. He has provided the viewer with the means to fill the abhorrent vacuum in the silver beam, by including its missing portion on the other side of the yellow strut. The missing semicircle at a busy intersection of folding yellow forms, even has two triangular tails that seem to turn the circle into an arrow, directing the eye across to the silver beam.

Start begs to be unfolded and righted. It's conspicuous presence on a well-traveled thoroughfare invites viewers to project their own ideas of the forms coming together and organizing themselves according to their color and size.

The precise measurements of elements in Davis' work often reveals the system of harmonious relationships he developed during his prolific career. He founded a system he dubbed the "Harmonic Grid" that starts with a 3::1 rectangle that serves as a drafting board for complex intersections and constructions of rectangles, triangles and circles. He then folds, welds, and perforates along these lines, playing with negative space and thickness, to create complicated but aesthetically harmonious pieces. Start is not a Harmonic Grid piece in construction, but the systemic influences from Davis' other work certainly help illuminate an otherwise cryptic piece of sculpture.

Davis' style is often characterized by absolute freedom within an absolute system, much like music and mathematics. Edward Henning, head curator of Modern Art at the CMA during Davis' career, wrote an essay on Davis that likened his systemic, structured approach to the creation of visual arts to that of music. Music is composed within a system that defines the proportional relationships between notes that a given piece consists of, based off of only three major structural components: rhythm, melody, and harmony. Similarly, Davis' work is composed on a system that defines the proportional relationships among the visual elements that a given piece consists of, based on three major structural components: the rectangle, triangle, and circle. Henning notes that Davis' work within the Harmonic Grid tends to behave like a language; it is "based on a rationally conceived system which yet allows for an almost infinite variety of forms."

In interviews, Davis seems to be an advocate of understanding the "visual syntax" of his scultpure before making critical evaluations, citing once a quotation from Pablo Picasso: "I cannot speak a word of Chinese, but I would be a fool to deny the existence of the Chinese language." It wouldn't make sense to critically analyze Anna Karenina in Russian, applying only your understanding of the English syntax and alphabet.

While Start does not categorically fall under the umbrella of a Harmonic Grid piece (aligning itself more with a series of Arches he did), it does reflect the consistent juxtaposition of natural forms and proportions against industrial materials and aesthetics.

Location: corner of Juniper and Magnolia in University Circle

County

: Cuyahoga

Citation

: David E. Davis, “Start,” Ohio Outdoor Sculpture Inventory, accessed September 23, 2017, http://oosi.sculpturecenter.org/items/show/86.

Dublin Core

Title

Start

Description

Start seems to unfold through time and space over a well traveled walkway. On one side, a red base with a square cutout supports a 52" wide yellow strut that splits and twists overhead, meeting with a 26" silver beam with a semi circular cutout. Davis' clever use of color, composition, and size starts the viewers eye at the pop of red along the base. We are then lead up to the intersection of the two elements, where Davis expertly transitions from one section to the other by way of negative space. He has provided the viewer with the means to fill the abhorrent vacuum in the silver beam, by including its missing portion on the other side of the yellow strut. The missing semicircle at a busy intersection of folding yellow forms, even has two triangular tails that seem to turn the circle into an arrow, directing the eye across to the silver beam.

Start begs to be unfolded and righted. It's conspicuous presence on a well-traveled thoroughfare invites viewers to project their own ideas of the forms coming together and organizing themselves according to their color and size.

The precise measurements of elements in Davis' work often reveals the system of harmonious relationships he developed during his prolific career. He founded a system he dubbed the "Harmonic Grid" that starts with a 3::1 rectangle that serves as a drafting board for complex intersections and constructions of rectangles, triangles and circles. He then folds, welds, and perforates along these lines, playing with negative space and thickness, to create complicated but aesthetically harmonious pieces. Start is not a Harmonic Grid piece in construction, but the systemic influences from Davis' other work certainly help illuminate an otherwise cryptic piece of sculpture.

Davis' style is often characterized by absolute freedom within an absolute system, much like music and mathematics. Edward Henning, head curator of Modern Art at the CMA during Davis' career, wrote an essay on Davis that likened his systemic, structured approach to the creation of visual arts to that of music. Music is composed within a system that defines the proportional relationships between notes that a given piece consists of, based off of only three major structural components: rhythm, melody, and harmony. Similarly, Davis' work is composed on a system that defines the proportional relationships among the visual elements that a given piece consists of, based on three major structural components: the rectangle, triangle, and circle. Henning notes that Davis' work within the Harmonic Grid tends to behave like a language; it is "based on a rationally conceived system which yet allows for an almost infinite variety of forms."

In interviews, Davis seems to be an advocate of understanding the "visual syntax" of his scultpure before making critical evaluations, citing once a quotation from Pablo Picasso: "I cannot speak a word of Chinese, but I would be a fool to deny the existence of the Chinese language." It wouldn't make sense to critically analyze Anna Karenina in Russian, applying only your understanding of the English syntax and alphabet.

While Start does not categorically fall under the umbrella of a Harmonic Grid piece (aligning itself more with a series of Arches he did), it does reflect the consistent juxtaposition of natural forms and proportions against industrial materials and aesthetics.

Creator

Date

1981

Sculpture Item Type Metadata

Location City

Location County

Location Site

corner of Juniper and Magnolia in University Circle

Creation Date

01/01/1981