OOSI Sculpture

Door

1986 / Gene Kangas / Cleveland

Door-1 2016.jpg

Door surrealistically zooms into existence from the ground and presents us with an enigmatic domestic scene. 5 abstracted door frames made from solid metal sheets rise from right to left one by one, as if growing out of the ground. Perpendicular to the final frame, is a life-sized door frame, complete with a swung open the door. Standing in the doorway is the silhouette of a woman.

The woman is modeled after the artist's mother, and her floral dress puts her into a symbolic position of Mother Earth. Beside her, is the silhouette of a little boy wearing a baseball mitt, modeled after the son of one of Kangas' friends. Behind both of them, on a perpendicular plane, a man in a coat walks away with a briefcase in his hand.

The cat that sits on top of the doorway is the same cat, from Kangas' other work, Dingle. He stares at the birds that dot the I-beams rising out of the ground. Kangas noted that the introduction of domestic/wild animals into a piece with humans instantly creates a series of complex and interesting relationships ie. pet/master, predator/prey, etc.

One reason that Kangas mentioned for loving silhouettes in his pieces, is that by necessity, there are many angles where important pieces of the work completely disappear. When looking at the mother/son head on, it's nearly impossible to see the man. And when looking at the man in profile, the rest of the family is thin, narrow, and obscured by the doorway. He said that basing what you can see on what you are focusing on helps craft a narrative for each of the characters, and expands their relationship in a unique way that cannot be as well executed otherwise.

The installation of Door was heavily protested by men and women who felt the domestic scene that was represented was "forcing women into traditional gender roles." Kangas, however, stated that the piece isn't making a commentary on what should or shouldn't happen, rather he wanted to abstract a slice of some lives, where the father works, the child plays, and the mother stays at home.

Location: On a hill next to the Sciences and Research Building., 2351 Euclid Avenue

County

: Cuyahoga

Tags

:

Citation

: Gene Kangas, “Door,” Ohio Outdoor Sculpture Inventory, accessed August 16, 2017, http://oosi.sculpturecenter.org/items/show/336.

Dublin Core

Title

Door

Description

Door surrealistically zooms into existence from the ground and presents us with an enigmatic domestic scene. 5 abstracted door frames made from solid metal sheets rise from right to left one by one, as if growing out of the ground. Perpendicular to the final frame, is a life-sized door frame, complete with a swung open the door. Standing in the doorway is the silhouette of a woman.

The woman is modeled after the artist's mother, and her floral dress puts her into a symbolic position of Mother Earth. Beside her, is the silhouette of a little boy wearing a baseball mitt, modeled after the son of one of Kangas' friends. Behind both of them, on a perpendicular plane, a man in a coat walks away with a briefcase in his hand.

The cat that sits on top of the doorway is the same cat, from Kangas' other work, Dingle. He stares at the birds that dot the I-beams rising out of the ground. Kangas noted that the introduction of domestic/wild animals into a piece with humans instantly creates a series of complex and interesting relationships ie. pet/master, predator/prey, etc.

One reason that Kangas mentioned for loving silhouettes in his pieces, is that by necessity, there are many angles where important pieces of the work completely disappear. When looking at the mother/son head on, it's nearly impossible to see the man. And when looking at the man in profile, the rest of the family is thin, narrow, and obscured by the doorway. He said that basing what you can see on what you are focusing on helps craft a narrative for each of the characters, and expands their relationship in a unique way that cannot be as well executed otherwise.

The installation of Door was heavily protested by men and women who felt the domestic scene that was represented was "forcing women into traditional gender roles." Kangas, however, stated that the piece isn't making a commentary on what should or shouldn't happen, rather he wanted to abstract a slice of some lives, where the father works, the child plays, and the mother stays at home.

Creator

Date

1986

Sculpture Item Type Metadata

Location City

Location County

Location Site

On a hill next to the Sciences and Research Building.

Location Street

2351 Euclid Avenue

Creation Date

01/01/1986