OOSI Sculpture

The Lexington Village Memorial

1989 / Paul J. Volpe / Cleveland

hough.jpg

The Hough neighborhood in Cleveland is one of the most historic districts in the city. Beginning as a prosperous, wealthy neighborhood at the end of the nineteenth century, Hough was home to some of the most prominent citizens of the most prominent city in the US at that time: Cleveland. Hough was the original home of the Cleveland Indians (or the Cleveland Spiders, as they were known then) and League Park in Hough is where the first and only unassisted triple play in the World Series took place.

The Great Depression and post-war years took a devastating toll on the Hough neighborhood though. Many of the original residents moved out into the suburbs, while many African Americans from the South settled down in Hough as a result of the Second Great Migration.

The 60's saw absentee landlords, a crumbled tax base, and rampant racism fanning the already roaring flames of racial tensions between blacks and whites in the neighborhood. But it wasn't until the disgruntled owner of Seventy Niners' Cafe at 79th and Hough hung a sign reading "No Water for N*****s" on his door as a response to a black customer asking for water that a long overdue riot flared up.

Over the course of about a week, millions of dollars of damage were done to the neighborhood. Shops and homes were looted and destroyed. Injuries and deaths dotted the streets, ensconced in flame.

At the time of this monument's erection, Hough was the second poorest district in the city. It never truly recovered from the riot, and that is what this obelisk commemorates. Fannie Lewis, famed councilwoman who represented the Hough for many years, oversaw most of the design. The monument is meant to honor the perseverance and life of the Hough neighborhood: to celebrate the history and culture of the area beyond just the Riots. The monument stands at the same intersection where the Riots are popularly believed to have begun.

Location: East 79th and Hough Ave

County

: Cuyahoga

Citation

: Paul J. Volpe, “The Lexington Village Memorial,” Ohio Outdoor Sculpture Inventory, accessed September 18, 2018, http://oosi.sculpturecenter.org/items/show/1524.

Dublin Core

Title

The Lexington Village Memorial

Description

The Hough neighborhood in Cleveland is one of the most historic districts in the city. Beginning as a prosperous, wealthy neighborhood at the end of the nineteenth century, Hough was home to some of the most prominent citizens of the most prominent city in the US at that time: Cleveland. Hough was the original home of the Cleveland Indians (or the Cleveland Spiders, as they were known then) and League Park in Hough is where the first and only unassisted triple play in the World Series took place.

The Great Depression and post-war years took a devastating toll on the Hough neighborhood though. Many of the original residents moved out into the suburbs, while many African Americans from the South settled down in Hough as a result of the Second Great Migration.

The 60's saw absentee landlords, a crumbled tax base, and rampant racism fanning the already roaring flames of racial tensions between blacks and whites in the neighborhood. But it wasn't until the disgruntled owner of Seventy Niners' Cafe at 79th and Hough hung a sign reading "No Water for N*****s" on his door as a response to a black customer asking for water that a long overdue riot flared up.

Over the course of about a week, millions of dollars of damage were done to the neighborhood. Shops and homes were looted and destroyed. Injuries and deaths dotted the streets, ensconced in flame.

At the time of this monument's erection, Hough was the second poorest district in the city. It never truly recovered from the riot, and that is what this obelisk commemorates. Fannie Lewis, famed councilwoman who represented the Hough for many years, oversaw most of the design. The monument is meant to honor the perseverance and life of the Hough neighborhood: to celebrate the history and culture of the area beyond just the Riots. The monument stands at the same intersection where the Riots are popularly believed to have begun.

Creator

Date

1989

Sculpture Item Type Metadata

Location City

Location County

Location Street

East 79th and Hough Ave