OOSI Sculpture

John and Mildred Putnam Sculpture Garden - Dancers

2008 / Richard Fleischman / Cleveland

PSG8 2017.jpg

What was once an empty, urban lot has been converted into a quiet, inviting, and entirely unique amphitheater space. Richard Fleischmann, the mind behind the Sculpture Garden, was an architect by trade. However, he joined Karl Floyd and Phillip Johnson as the third artist in the Putnam Collection to create a space as a sculptor, rather than an architect.

The sculpture garden consists of three main elements: the agave blue spires that curl out of the ground, the purple aluminum benches, and the stepped-amphitheater, highlighted by a bright green decoration on the bannister.

Concrete forms the general shape and flow of the space. It begins as a rotunda, lined with benches that face inwardly and outwardly. A path then leads up to the rounded theater space. The seats slope up out of nothing and are abruptly cut off by a swooping band of concrete, topped off by an undulating sheet of green metal.

Benches line both the rotunda and the theater. They face out for those who might want to observe and reflect in the space, and they face in for those who might want to bring their friends and talk.

Finally, light blue steel structures shoot out of the surrounding grass like Seussian trees. Each one of them arches outward, creating the feeling of a shallow canopy overhead. The curves in the metal also help shape the space into a spherical one, rather than a circular one.

Between the name "garden", the benches, and the theatrical set-up, an evident goal of the Putnam Sculpture Garden is exploring the dichotomy between audience and performer. We can visit the space and interact with the art either as doers or watchers. We can face out or in on the bench, and we can be on the stage or in the risers. The Garden forces us to make these choice upon entry, perhaps to help us all learn a little more about ourselves.

County

: Cuyahoga

Tags

: , ,

Citation

: Richard Fleischman, “John and Mildred Putnam Sculpture Garden - Dancers,” Ohio Outdoor Sculpture Inventory, accessed December 12, 2017, http://oosi.sculpturecenter.org/items/show/1368.

Dublin Core

Title

John and Mildred Putnam Sculpture Garden - Dancers

Description

What was once an empty, urban lot has been converted into a quiet, inviting, and entirely unique amphitheater space. Richard Fleischmann, the mind behind the Sculpture Garden, was an architect by trade. However, he joined Karl Floyd and Phillip Johnson as the third artist in the Putnam Collection to create a space as a sculptor, rather than an architect.

The sculpture garden consists of three main elements: the agave blue spires that curl out of the ground, the purple aluminum benches, and the stepped-amphitheater, highlighted by a bright green decoration on the bannister.

Concrete forms the general shape and flow of the space. It begins as a rotunda, lined with benches that face inwardly and outwardly. A path then leads up to the rounded theater space. The seats slope up out of nothing and are abruptly cut off by a swooping band of concrete, topped off by an undulating sheet of green metal.

Benches line both the rotunda and the theater. They face out for those who might want to observe and reflect in the space, and they face in for those who might want to bring their friends and talk.

Finally, light blue steel structures shoot out of the surrounding grass like Seussian trees. Each one of them arches outward, creating the feeling of a shallow canopy overhead. The curves in the metal also help shape the space into a spherical one, rather than a circular one.

Between the name "garden", the benches, and the theatrical set-up, an evident goal of the Putnam Sculpture Garden is exploring the dichotomy between audience and performer. We can visit the space and interact with the art either as doers or watchers. We can face out or in on the bench, and we can be on the stage or in the risers. The Garden forces us to make these choice upon entry, perhaps to help us all learn a little more about ourselves.

Date

2008

Sculpture Item Type Metadata

Location City

Location County