OOSI Sculpture

Man's Quest

1969 / Clarence Van Duzer & Kenneth Bates / Cleveland

Mans Quest-1 2016.jpg

A mural given to CSU by the Ferro company in 1969 as a present, it was sculpted by Cleveland's own Clarence Van Duzer. Van Duzer was an accomplished painter and sculptor, but this work is quite uncharacteristic of him. Where he normally springs for bold colors, stylized lines, and distinct shapes, Man's Quest opts for earthy tones and rough, overlapping edges. Van Duzer combined his talents with master enameler Kenneth Bates to add even more depth to this sculpture. The enameled parts play with light much differently than just the plain metal.

Man's Quest is gritty, dirty, and unabashedly terrestrial in its composition. The repeating circular forms and hard solid edges resemble everything from ancient mesoamerican carving to the forest floor. Additionally, Man's Quest functions uniquely as a an art piece because it hangs on the wall like a painting, but behaves nothing like neither a traditional painting nor a traditional sculpture.

The name Man's Quest is most interesting when one notices that the last "panel" is an inverted copy of the first. Are van Duzer and Bates making a commentary on the futility of struggle? Or are they exploring how satisfying the circle of fulfillment is?

Location: Cleveland State University, Science Building, Euclid Ave.

Tags

:

Citation

: Clarence Van Duzer and Kenneth Bates, “Man's Quest,” Ohio Outdoor Sculpture Inventory, accessed December 13, 2017, http://oosi.sculpturecenter.org/items/show/1250.

Dublin Core

Title

Man's Quest

Description

A mural given to CSU by the Ferro company in 1969 as a present, it was sculpted by Cleveland's own Clarence Van Duzer. Van Duzer was an accomplished painter and sculptor, but this work is quite uncharacteristic of him. Where he normally springs for bold colors, stylized lines, and distinct shapes, Man's Quest opts for earthy tones and rough, overlapping edges. Van Duzer combined his talents with master enameler Kenneth Bates to add even more depth to this sculpture. The enameled parts play with light much differently than just the plain metal.

Man's Quest is gritty, dirty, and unabashedly terrestrial in its composition. The repeating circular forms and hard solid edges resemble everything from ancient mesoamerican carving to the forest floor. Additionally, Man's Quest functions uniquely as a an art piece because it hangs on the wall like a painting, but behaves nothing like neither a traditional painting nor a traditional sculpture.

The name Man's Quest is most interesting when one notices that the last "panel" is an inverted copy of the first. Are van Duzer and Bates making a commentary on the futility of struggle? Or are they exploring how satisfying the circle of fulfillment is?

Date

1969

Format

Sculpture Item Type Metadata

Location City

Location Site

Cleveland State University
Science Building

Location Street

Euclid Ave.